dutch
international
science
film festival

Third edition 08 t/m 12
nov 2017
Nijmegen

WebsiteHeaderInscience2017

Generating and managing the ceaseless flow of news, social media and questionable facts has become a full-time job. There is a new political climate where accusations of falseness, even ‘alternative facts’ or ‘fake news’, have become a new tool to play on among competing sources of information. What is real and what is fake? 

The theme of the third edition of InScience is ‘No facts, no future’. With that, the festival takes the position in the era of alternative facts, post truth and the belief that science is also an opinion. In this day and age it’s important to remember that science is what has built the society we know today.

Program InScience 2017
InScience is a five-day journey of discovery and gives you a glimpse into a new world. The program offers a high-quality line-up of carefully selected science films, more than one hundred scientists and directors to discuss and debate these films. Several artists will also be present to share their diverging views.

Competition program
The competition Program is the festival’s most prestigious competition. One of the films will be awarded with the NTR Audience Award.

The 3rd edition of InScience Dutch International Science Film Festival will be from Wednesday 8 November till Sunday 12 November 2017. The full program will be announced in September and the ticket sale starts on Thursday 19 October.

 

 

dutch
international
science
film festival

Third edition 08 t/m 12
nov 2017
Nijmegen

InScience_MarcelvanDijk

InScience invites scientists, universities and research groups to submit a research proposal for this year’s festival program. The program will include several research settings where visitors can participate in scientific research. By means of this call, visitors experience how scientific research is established. The film festival offers a unique opportunity to set up an experimental research in a festival setting.

InScience is a unique film festival to The Netherlands. The filmfestival focuses on science film and shows science via film to a broad audience. InScience dares science, the arts and society to enter the dialogue. The program of InScience most importantly exists of an overview of the best science films of the year. InScience offers a broad program, with talks, film debates, Q&A’s, meetings and expositions on the cutting edge of science and art.

For scientists, InScience is interesting because the festival brings together a specific audience in a specific context. In addition, film, in all its appearances, offers many opportunities for scientific research. Consider research into the relationship between eating behavior and visual stimuli or the way in which movies affect attitudes. In addition to traditional film, InScience also offers a platform for VR. Moreover, InScience for researchers is a great opportunity to generate publicity for their research.

criteria for a proposal:

/ The research is interesting and relevant to the visitor of InScience
/ The research complies with the ethical guidelines of the VSNU
/ The research joins (preferably) in the Film or VR program of InScience
/  All science disciplines are challenged to submit a proposal
/ The research serves a clear scientific purpose

the proposal consists of:

/ Name of researcher
/ Name of institution
/ Short CV
/ Team size
/ Issue
/ Research question
/ Hypotheses
/ Method
/ What support do you need from InScience?
/ The size of the proposal is up to 1500 words

deadline:

Send your application before 1 June 2017 to info@insciencefestival.nl indicating ‘Call for Proposal research’.
Selected proposals are informed before June 10th.

Questions?

Contact Program Maker Talks, Stefan Schevelier, via stefan@insciencefestival.nl

dutch
international
science
film festival

Third edition 08 t/m 12
nov 2017
Nijmegen

InScience16 Zondag Awarduitreiking – (c)Jimmy Israel-01

InScience, the Dutch International Science Film Festival, is the initiator of the European Academy of Science Film together with ten European film festivals. The purpose of the Academy is to strengthen the position of the European science film. This year, the Academy awards the prize for best European Science Film for the first time.

The Academy Award is part of the European Academy of Science Film (EURASF). All participating festivals nominate a film from their official competition program. InScience has nominated the film Jheronimus Bosch, Touched By The Devil from the Dutxh director Pieter van Huystee. The Academy will award the prize this year for the first time at the International Film Festival Academia Film Olomouc (AFO) on Saturday April 29th in the Czech Republic.

The European Academy of Science Film is also promoting a European network of film makers, producers, festival organizers and science communicators, exchanges of knowledge between academy members, cooperation with organizations at national and international level and shows science via film to a broad audience.

dutch
international
science
film festival

Third edition 08 t/m 12
nov 2017
Nijmegen

Persfoto_BFeringa_RUG

Ben Feringa is committed as ambassador to InScience, Dutch International Science Film Festival. In 2016 Feringa won the Nobel Prize in Chemistry. As ambassador, Feringa underlines the importance of InScience as the Dutch science film festival. 

Feringa joins the other ambassadors of InScience like Robbert Dijkgraaf (Director Institute for Advanced Studies in Princeton), Rob van Hattum (Chief Science Officer NEMO Science Center), Daniel Dennett (Cognitive scientist and philosopher), José van Dijck (Royal Dutch Academy of Arts and Sciences), Hoyte van Hoytema (Cinematographer), Hubert Bruls (Mayor of Nijmegen) and Martin Stratmann (Max Planck Society). Feringa is professor of Organic Chemistry at the University of Groningen.

dutch
international
science
film festival

Third edition 08 t/m 12
nov 2017
Nijmegen

CallForEntry

The InScience festival team has started preparing the 3rd edition. We are now accepting entries for our competition program. We invite you to amaze us with compelling and visually stunning feature films, shorts, animation and documentaries that show science and scientists in an artistic manner, while maintaining credible scientific groundings. All films completed in 2016 and 2017 are eligible to compete in our competition. Films in all categories from feature films to documentaries, shorts and animation are accepted. Submissions are open until June 27th 2017.

Competition
A selection of the films will be part of the competition program. These films are in the running for several awards, including the NTR audience award, in different categories. All the awards will be announced during the awards night ceremony on the last day of the festival.

Please read our rules & regulations before submitting your film to find out if it is eligible for submission. Our entry form can be found on inscience.filmchief.com.

dutch
international
science
film festival

Third edition 08 t/m 12
nov 2017
Nijmegen

logo-square2

Camp 4science is in search of ideas. 


Is it within your line of ambitions to be a filmmaker? Do you think you have that one idea to make a science film or documentary, but lack the experience or funding? Apply now for Camp 4Science. If your idea gets chosen, international mentors with experience on scientific film and documentary making will guide you. The focus during this training will be about developing and funding films and documentaries with a special emphasis on Central and Eastern Europe. Don’t keep your ideas to yourself, but make them a reality by applying now! (Applications will be open untill February 17th 2017).

Read more http://www.afo.cz/industry-4science/

Camp 4Science is a part of ‘Industry 4 Science’ at Academia Film Olomouc that currently ranks among the top European festivals focusing on science films and documentaries. The festival takes place from April 25 – 30, 2017 in Olomouc, one of the biggest cities in the Czech Republic.

dutch
international
science
film festival

Third edition 08 t/m 12
nov 2017
Nijmegen

still-zo-6-10-spin-awards

This is what happened on the fifth and last day of InScience!

The juniors were competeting for the title of the smartest at the Science quiz.

The Big Ideas was closed by Renee Lertzman. She critically discussed our attitude towards climate change.

In the evening the awards were handed out and Rosita the tarantula made an appearance after the film Maratus.

dutch
international
science
film festival

Third edition 08 t/m 12
nov 2017
Nijmegen

step-inside-the-large-hadron-collider

InScience 2016 Included a VR-epxerience with several films. Of these films three were made by Stephen Beckett (BBC Click). Beckett has a lot of knowledge when it comes to 360⁰ filming and we had the chance to get a short interview with this man.


You produced (at BBC Click) the first television program completely filmed in 360⁰. How did this idea come about?

Stephen: As much as possible we like to really use new technology on Click rather than just talking about it – last year we filmed and edited an episode only using phones and tablets, and this year we wanted to challenge ourselves again. Making a 25 minute programme in 360⁰ felt like a good way to do this.

There’s lots of great shorter 360 content out there now, but not many people are looking at whether 360 can work for telling stories in longer formats. So for us, the show was also a way of exploring this question.


The full program contains a lot of different subjects: glaciers, a hydrology lab, CERN and even the Click studio backstage. How and why did you pick your subjects for this specific episode

Stephen: There’s a temptation when you’re planning 360 films to immediately go for the most exciting shots you can think of – I’m talking strapping the viewer to a fighter jet or locking them in a shark cage. 360 definitely is brilliant for that sort of thing – but for the Click show we wanted to make sure that we still had strong science and tech stories at the core, like a normal episode of the programme.

At the same time the content also still had to be ‘good in 360,’ that’s to say making the most of what 360 can offer, things like immersion and presence. I definitely subscribe to the idea that 360 isn’t the right way to tell every story, if you can tell it brilliantly using traditional methods, then you probably should. I’d like to think that in our case though 360 really adds something for the viewer, rather than just being an interesting gimmick.


You were basically pioneering with this new technology for your format. Were there any difficulties you came across that you didn’t expect and how did you deal with them?

Stephen: We’re still at the very early stages of 360 filmmaking, so in a sense we’re waiting for the technology to catch up. It quite exciting, because it does feel like you’re discovering and experimenting, but it also means it’s a much slower and more complicated process compared to traditional filmmaking.

Beyond the creative challenges of how to tell stories in this new way, you’re also working with the 1st generation of the cameras and software tools. That meant we spent a lot longer than we normally would on post-production, trying to make shots perfect, and not have the presenter’s face disappear for example when he moves between cameras.

That said though, it’s great that we’re at the stage where this is possible at all, and with better, more affordable cameras and software coming out all the time, it does feel like interest in VR and 360 is snowballing.


The episode has been out now for several months. What has the audience response been like? Do they take to the new medium and its possibilities?

Stephen: We’ve had some really great feedback for the show – for a lot of people it has been their first taste of virtual reality, so there’s been lots of excitement from viewers.

One criticism I have had is that I look a quite bored during the CERN piece (I am the person carrying the camera at one point) – actually I was just intensely focussed on getting a smooth shot! But yes, it was a great challenge to take on and there is a lot of interest in us telling more stories in 360.


What about you and the people at BBC Click, are you interested in making more episodes this way? Do you have ideas about where you could take it?

Stephen: We’re not looking at creating a full episode again right now – until the tech catches up it’s a big undertaking for a weekly show like Click. We definitely are working on a number of individual 360 stories though, and something I’m also hoping to do soon is to create a more interactive feature involving elements of virtual reality. I can’t say exactly what we’re working on yet, but there will certainly be some new technology and science 360 content coming from Click in the near future.

dutch
international
science
film festival

Third edition 08 t/m 12
nov 2017
Nijmegen

still-za-5-10-james-garvey

Have a look at the video of the forth day of InScience 2016.

Today’s Big Ideas guest was James Garvey. He talked about our thinking and behaviour and about how much we still actually control that.

dutch
international
science
film festival

Third edition 08 t/m 12
nov 2017
Nijmegen

still-vr-4-10-human-trial

Have a look below to get an impression of the third day of InScience 2016

The Sciencejunction of the Radboud Universiteit gave a masterclass about: stimulating curiosity  by youngsters through learning on the hand of researching

Lisa Hepner & Jonathan Formica were invited tot tell about the film The Human Trial.

The Big Ideas of the third day revolved around molecular animations and was given by Drew Berry